View Mobile Site
 

Ask the Expert

Signal Photos

 

Saugus Union School District campus supervisors receive special training

Posted: April 30, 2016 10:09 a.m.
Updated: April 30, 2016 10:09 a.m.
Jill Bloom, along with 84 other campus supervisors in a Santa Clarita Valley school district, has been practicing something called “dealing with the feeling,” a technique that allows for balanced and effective communication between a child and adult. Jill Bloom, along with 84 other campus supervisors in a Santa Clarita Valley school district, has been practicing something called “dealing with the feeling,” a technique that allows for balanced and effective communication between a child and adult.
Jill Bloom, along with 84 other campus supervisors in a Santa Clarita Valley school district, has been practicing something called “dealing with the feeling,” a technique that allows for balanced and effective communication between a child and adult.
A A A

Jill Bloom, along with 84 other campus supervisors in a Santa Clarita Valley school district, has been practicing something called “dealing with the feeling,” a technique that allows for balanced and effective communication between a child and adult.

The idea is to “spot it, say it and ok it.” That means identify the feeling, such as sadness or anger, say the feeling out loud and then validate it, letting the child know that it’s perfectly normal to feel a certain way.

This is just one technique of many that Bloom and all the campus supervisors at Saugus Union School District recently learned. They participated in a special training event led by Roma Khetarpal, author of “the ‘Perfect’ Parent,” earlier this year in which tools used by parents were adapted for the campus supervisors.
“The training was phenomenal,” Bloom said. “It reinforces how you approach a child.”

“If you’re not engaging in an appropriate way, they will fail,” she added.

Bloom said the training taught her the importance of looking a child in the eye to make sure the student feels important; to teach respect by giving a child respect; and to use positive reinforcement in every situation.

“There are positive ways to approach it to make it more successful to the (student),” she said.

Khetarpal was approached by district superintendent Joan Lucid after a book-signing in 2014, and the two discussed the possibility of a training program.

“It was nothing I had imagined,” Khetarpal said, addng she never expected to create a program specifically for campus supervisors.

She did several focus groups to make sure her new program would, in fact, work for those who interact with students year after year, monitoring them before school, at recess and at lunch every single school day.

Among the goals of the program is equipping campus supervisors with strategies for communicating with youngsters.

“Tell children what to do. Not what not to do,” Khetarpal said. “We’re spinning them in the opposite direction.”

Khetarpal used the example of telling a child “do not run” versus telling that child to “walk.” A person, even an adult, is more inclined to want to do the action heard, she said.

She also explained to campus supervisors how emotional intelligence drives communication. Campus supervisors can help build a student’s emotional vocabulary by helping the child to recognize his emotions, which allows him to put his feelings into words.

As part of the Local Control Accountability Plan, the school district took a look at the students’ sense of safety and how comfortable they were with talking to an adult, Lucid said.

“The folks out on our yard with our children everyday need to have more strategies,” the superintendent said.

The training is in conjunction with several other initiatives happening within the district, including the Circle of Friends and the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports.

The Circle of Friends is a program in which students educate special needs students on how to develop conversational skills. The Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports also aims at improving communication, in this case between teachers and students.

“When we invest in them (teachers and campus supervisors), we invest in our children,” Lucid said.

Comments

Most Popular Articles

There are no articles at this time.
Commenting not available.
Commenting is not available.

 
 

Powered By
Morris Technology
Please wait ...