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SCV cancer advocates participate in National Cancer Moonshot

Posted: June 29, 2016 7:21 p.m.
Updated: June 29, 2016 7:21 p.m.
The National Cancer Moonshot was initially announced during President Barack Obama’s state of the union address in January. The National Cancer Moonshot was initially announced during President Barack Obama’s state of the union address in January.
The National Cancer Moonshot was initially announced during President Barack Obama’s state of the union address in January.
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Local cancer survivors, advocates and leaders took part in a nationwide discussion Wednesday in the Santa Clarita Valley to form new alliances in an effort to find a cure for cancer.

The National Cancer Moonshot, led by Vice President Joe Biden, is meant to enhance the conversation between doctors, researchers, patients and all those digging in to treatments and early detection by collaborating and sharing data.
Biden live-streamed a message Wednesday to more than 270 summits across the nation, including the Los Angeles summit held at The Master’s University.

“The goal is to seize the moment, celebrate our efforts and literally push the boundaries of what is possible,” Biden said during the conference call.

“We’re not done after today. This is just the start,” he added, stating the hope is to make a decade’s worth of progress in the next five years.

Following the conference call, seven panelists told their stories to a group of about 15 people who attended the summit at The Master’s University. All the panelists were survivors of cancer or had children who were diagnosed with cancer.
Two of the speakers said cannabis was successful as a treatment for cancer.

Tracy Ryan, founder of Cannakids, outlined positive effects of cannabis on her cancer-suffering daughter Sophie, now nearly 4 years old.

“It helps decimate cancer cells when you have the right strain,” Ryan said.

Sophie Ryan was diagnosed with brain cancer at 8 ½ months. Doctors told Tracy Ryan and her husband, Josh, that chemotherapy was the only option, but they scoured the internet to find a different solution and discovered cannabis oil.
Sophie started a combined treatment of chemo and cannabis oil. After 13 months, her brain tumor had shrunk about 85-90 percent – something her doctors never expected, her mother said.

It was also expected that Sophie would go blind because of the tumor, but because the cannabis shrunk the tumor, her eyesight was saved, Ryan said.

“Her only side effects are sleepiness and giddiness,” she said.

Aryn Sieber, founder of Cannacauses Foundation, talked Wednesday about how cannabis had cured his own cancer.
He was diagnosed with throat and neck cancer in 2014, which he said is a result of being a 9/11 Ground Zero first responder volunteer. To help relieve the side effects of his chemo and radiation treatments and minimize the need for opiates, he began medicating with cannabis.

“Five months later, my cancer went into complete remission,” Sieber said.

His goal now with the Canna Causes Foundation is to educate people about being responsible, he added.

“This is a great opportunity for us to come together,” Sieber said. “We need to unite our effort.”

The National Cancer Moonshot was initially announced during President Barack Obama’s state of the union address in January.

The White House has proposed approximately $1 billion in the 2016-17 fiscal year toward the initiative to find a cure for cancer. Funds will support new prevention strategies, vaccine developments, early detection, therapies, research, data-sharing and more.

“This effort is going to require millions of Americans to step up,” Biden said during the conference call Wednesday, calling for individuals and organizations to work together.

 

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