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Champions of history

Education: Sixth-graders win award for creating website about the history of Los Angeles Aqueduct

Posted: May 22, 2010 7:40 p.m.
Updated: May 23, 2010 4:55 a.m.
Castaic Middle School sixth-graders Andrea Marroquin, left, and Kyla Resnick display the second-place medals they earned in the Constitutional Rights Foundation’s statewide competition. Their project was a website they designed about the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Castaic Middle School sixth-graders Andrea Marroquin, left, and Kyla Resnick display the second-place medals they earned in the Constitutional Rights Foundation’s statewide competition. Their project was a website they designed about the Los Angeles Aqueduct.
Castaic Middle School sixth-graders Andrea Marroquin, left, and Kyla Resnick display the second-place medals they earned in the Constitutional Rights Foundation’s statewide competition. Their project was a website they designed about the Los Angeles Aqueduct.
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Sixth-graders Kyla Resnick and Andrea Marroquin are history buffs — and they have their state championship medals to prove it.

The two Castaic Middle School students recently earned second place for a website they created about the Los Angeles Aqueduct as part of the Constitutional Rights Foundation’s State History Day competition.

The 12-year-old girls advanced to the state challenge in the website division after taking first place out of 18 competitors as part of the Los Angeles County History Day contest in March.

But the wins didn’t come easy.

Resnick and Marroquin spent about seven months building the website with little help from their parents or teachers. They met daily at lunch, stayed after school for hours and made time every Saturday to create the website, found at http://95448909.nhd.weebly.com.

“They’re such a couple of go-getters that all I really needed to do was check on them,” said Ro Osano, video production instructor and the school’s History Day adviser.

Through the process, the two friends mastered the research process as they used books, videos and field trips to learn about the aqueduct.

The two now recognize the significance of water, especially as it played a major role in the growth of Los Angeles.

“We’ve come to appreciate water more,” Resnick said.

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