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Well-heeled woman: SCV local heads National Federation of Democratic Women

Community: Canyon Country resident rose through the ranks of corporate America, Democratic party

Posted: March 28, 2011 1:55 a.m.
Updated: March 28, 2011 1:55 a.m.
An autographed photo of Jacqueline Kennedy and political buttons are among the more than 20,000 pieces of memorabilia that Pat and Max Hobbs, of Canyon Country, have collected over the years. An autographed photo of Jacqueline Kennedy and political buttons are among the more than 20,000 pieces of memorabilia that Pat and Max Hobbs, of Canyon Country, have collected over the years.
An autographed photo of Jacqueline Kennedy and political buttons are among the more than 20,000 pieces of memorabilia that Pat and Max Hobbs, of Canyon Country, have collected over the years.
Hobbs holds a silver medal commemorating the 1961 inauguration of President John F. Kennedy. Hobbs is the president of the National Federation of Democratic Women, putting her among the top Democratic leaders in the nation. The federation furthers the role of women in the Democratic Party and helps women enter politics and run campaigns. Hobbs holds a silver medal commemorating the 1961 inauguration of President John F. Kennedy. Hobbs is the president of the National Federation of Democratic Women, putting her among the top Democratic leaders in the nation. The federation furthers the role of women in the Democratic Party and helps women enter politics and run campaigns.
Hobbs holds a silver medal commemorating the 1961 inauguration of President John F. Kennedy. Hobbs is the president of the National Federation of Democratic Women, putting her among the top Democratic leaders in the nation. The federation furthers the role of women in the Democratic Party and helps women enter politics and run campaigns.
Pat Hobbs stands alongside some of the more than 20,000 pieces of political memorabilia that she and her husband, Max, have collected in her Canyon Country home. Pat Hobbs stands alongside some of the more than 20,000 pieces of political memorabilia that she and her husband, Max, have collected in her Canyon Country home.
Pat Hobbs stands alongside some of the more than 20,000 pieces of political memorabilia that she and her husband, Max, have collected in her Canyon Country home.
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More than half of voters are women — but women only make up 17 percent of Congress.

Canyon Country resident Pat Hobbs is working to change that.

“I think we’re on our way,” she said.

As president of the National Federation of Democratic Women, Hobbs, 66, is among the top Democratic leaders in the nation. The federation furthers the role of women in Democratic politics and helps women enter politics and run campaigns.

“There are no boundaries,” the focused and straightforward woman said. “You can be whatever you want to be. You should let your dreams go wild.”

Before becoming a leader in politics, Hobbs spent 32 years at Pacific Bell working as an account executive and managing accounts like ABC, CBS, NBC TV and radio stations, as well as the Academy Awards.

She was the only person to receive the top sales awards for five consecutive years in the position and quickly emerged as one of the strongest women leaders at the company, beating out the men who traditionally held account executive positions.

“I thought, ‘I can carry a briefcase just like they do,’” Hobbs said. “With my high heels on.”

An admitted political junkie, Hobbs soon found herself involved in campaigns, like Jimmy Carter’s 1980 presidential campaign and Bill Clinton’s campaigns in 1992 and 1996.

Most recently, she was involved in President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, along with numerous state assembly and city council candidates.

“To me, it’s just our right as citizens to vote for the people we think are going to do the best job,” Hobbs said, sitting at the home she shares with her husband, Max, 70, in Canyon Country.

The two share a political memorabilia collection, and buy and sell such items to collectors. In their home, they have display cases filled with items from the presidential campaigns of Richard Nixon, John F. Kennedy and Jimmy Carter. And they have a growing collection of Obama memorabilia.

Democratic Club of SCV President Allan Cameron has known the Hobbs family for years.

“She is one of the most influential Democrats in the entire world,” he said. “We’re blessed to have her in the Santa Clarita Valley. We look forward to her contributions locally, as well as nationally.”

Beyond politics, women still face struggles socially and economically, as women earn only 80 percent for some the same jobs as men, Hobbs said.

“The glass ceiling is cracked, but not broken,” Cameron said. “The most important thing that needs to change is the mindset men and women have of themselves. From that change would then flow practical things, like equal pay for equal work.”

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